Breast Cancer Awareness Month is still in full swing. In recognition of this important health issue, we highlight here several resources from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention so that our readers can explore some of the latest research on breast cancer.

Interventions to Increase Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Uptake Among Rural Women looks at the low uptake of breast and cervical cancer screening in rural communities and the interventions to help remove barriers to health care and address the unique needs of rural women.


Treatment Cost and Access to Care: Experiences of Young Women Diagnosed with Breast Cancer examines how cost affects breast cancer care among female breast cancer patients diagnosed between 18 and 39 years old.


New Study and Resources Bring Awareness to Breast Cancer in Men. Although it’s rare, men can get breast cancer too. In the United States, about 2,300 new cases of breast cancer and 500 deaths among men were reported in 2017. A new Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR) looks at breast cancer survival differences in men by factors such as race/ethnicity, age, diagnosis stage, and geographic region. Among men diagnosed with breast cancer during 2007-2016, the one-year survival rate was 96% and five-year survival rate was 85%. Survival rates for non-Hispanic Black men were the lowest compared to rates for non-Hispanic White men and Hispanic men.

More studies and resources can help increase awareness of breast cancer in men and support those at high risk. A new U.S. Cancer Statistics Data Brief on male breast cancer shows that from 2013 to 2017 men aged 60-69 had the highest percentage of male breast cancer cases and deaths. Our Breast Cancer Among Men blog answers important questions about the risks for this cancer and shares the latest research from the MMWR. A new breast cancer resource for men provides information to help men learn about male breast cancer symptoms and ways to reduce risk.

 

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